Audi Q4 E-Tron – What Can It Tow?


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While the Audi Q4 shares the same ‘E-Tron’ branding as the larger E-Tron 50/55 Quattro models the Q4 actually has more in common with the VW ID.4 and the Skoda Enyaq which all share the same MEB platform. Therefore, there are similarities between the towing capacity and range between all of the above mentioned MEB platform vehicles. As such the Q4 E-Tron comes with three power train options, the two rear-wheel-drive versions can tow up to 1,000 kg and the top of the range 50 Quattro can tow up to 1,200 kg.

Audi Q4 E-Tron - What Can It Tow?
The Audi Q4 E-Tron is basically a posh version of the other MEB platform alternatives the VW ID.4 and the Skoda Enyaq: Image – Audi.co.uk

Key Audi Q4 E-Tron Specs

  • Official Towing Capacity – 1,000 kg (35 & 40), 1,200 kg (50 Quattro)
  • Availability – Summer 2021
  • Price – Starting £40,750 (35) > £51,370 (50 Quattro)
  • Range (EV Database) – 175 miles (35) > 255 miles (40)
  • Estimated Towing Range (50%) – 88 miles (35) > 128 miles (40)
  • Maximum Charge Rate – 100 kW (35) > 126 kW (50 Quattro)

Audi Q4 E-Tron HP & Torque

  • 35 – RWD with 168 HP and 229 lb-ft of torque
  • 40 – RWD with 201 HP and 229 lb-ft of torque
  • 50 Quattro – AWD with 295 HP and 339 lb-ft of torque

Audi Q4 E-Tron Towing Capabilities

I can imagine the Audi Q4 being commonly referred to as the ‘small E-Tron’ which it is in comparison to the much larger E-Tron 50/55 Quattro models. However, as I stated in the introduction above, the Q4 really has more in common with the VW ID.4 and Skoda Enyaq as all these vehicles share the same MEB platform. Therefore, as with the ID.4 and Enyaq, the Audi Q4 E-Tron provides different towing capabilities depending on the specific model. The two rear-wheel-drive models both have a 1,000 kg maximum towing capacity, whereas the all-wheel-drive ‘Quattro’ model gets a slightly better 1,200 kg towing maximum capacity.

However, as with the other MEB platform models, while the most expensive all-wheel-drive version may have the largest towing capacity, it doesn’t actually have the longest range. The higher-spec rear-wheel-drive 40 model features the same 82 kWh battery as the 50 Quattro model. As a result due to the lower weight/lower resistance of the rear-wheel-drive system it actually gives slightly better range, at 255 miles for the Q4 40 and 240 miles for the Q4 50 Quattro. Which in turn means the Q4 40 will have a slightly longer towing range, though as stated at a lower maximum towing capacity.

A quick (1 minute) preview of the Audi Q4 E-Tron: Video – Audi.co.uk

Audi Q4 Towing Range Test

Below I’ve included a video by Bjørn Nyland, if you have browsed some of my other articles you may have seen other videos Bjørn has produced. Currently, when it comes to real-world EV capabilties, Bjørn produces some of the best content. In this video, Bjørn does a towing range test with a high box trailer which will have created quite a bit of aerodynamic drag, which as I discuss in my linked article plays a big part in how far an electric goes while towing. It is important to note however, the trailer was empty. Therefore, as Bjørn states, the weight of the trailer was probably only around 500 kg.

Towing range test of the Audi Q4 E-Tron

As can be seen in the video above, the Q4 comes with a discrete/hidden tow bracket which has become pretty standard now, at least on German/premium electric tow cars. Also in the backing up camera, you can see the tow ball (which is not the case on all backup cameras), hence Bjørn does a nice job of reversing right up to the tow ball. Bjørn does note though, unlike Tesla’s where you can leave the backup camera on while driving to watch the trailer, on the Audi Q4 it turns off once you engage the forward gear.

In terms of energy consumption, while towing, the Audi Q4 returned at 90 km/h (56 mph) 352 Wh/km (566 wh/mile). Which, if you check out my guide to electric tow car efficiency is not too bad for a tall boxy trailer like this with significant aerodynamic drag, though again, the weight was only around 500 kg. In terms of towing range, the Audi Q4 with this trailer could achieve 211 km (131 miles) which as you can see above is better than the estimated figures, which will partly be down to the relatively low weight of the trailer.

Audi Q4 E-Tron vs The Competition

Ok, so first let’s discuss the competition between its siblings sharing the same MEB platform, namely the VW ID.4 and the Skoda Enyaq. As of writing this article, the ID.4 is only available as an RWD variant with a 1,000 kg towing capacity at just over £41,000, the equivalent Enyaq comes in at just over £39,000. For the equivalent Audi Q4, it will cost you just under £45,000. For an AWD variant and the higher 1,200 kg towing capacity a Skoda Enyaq iV 80X starts from £42,000 whereas the Audi Q4 50 Quattro starts at just over £51,000.

Now, I’m not going to shock/surprise anyone by the fact an Audi is priced above a VW or Skoda branded vehicle, and I’d be pretty confident that most people would judge the interior quality to be superior on the Audi. Then again, particularly for the AWD varients, for cars with the same technical capabilities to be priced nearly £10,000 apart when it comes to the Skoda and Audi variants, you need to decide if that Audi badge is really worth that much extra to you.

BMW i4 and KIA EV6
The Audi Q4 E-Tron faces tough competition as an electric tow car from the likes of the BMW i4 (left) and KIA EV6 (right): Images – BMW.co.uk & Kia.co.uk

If we put brand value to one side for a second and look at other electric tow cars around the £50,000 price point of the Audi Q4 50 Quattro and compare them on a purely technical level what is the Audi up against? Well, you have the Polestar 2, it will tow 1,500 kg and charge faster up to 150 kW and starts from £47,000. The soon to be released Nissan Ariya will also tow 1,500 kg, charge a little bit faster at 130 kW, and starts from £45,000.

You also have the Hyundai IONIQ 5 and KIA EV6 which share the same platform and similar pricing. The IONIQ 5 and EV6 can tow 1,600 kg, charge much faster at 232 kW and are priced just under £50,000. When it comes to an alternative ‘premium’ brand there is the BMW i4 with its 1,600 kg towing capacity, 200kW charge rate and a £54,000 price point.

My Thoughts On The Audi Q4 E-Tron…

As I summarised above with a few quick comparisons between the Audi Q4 E-Tron and competition from its MEB platform siblings the VW ID.4 and Skoda Enyaq, the Audi Q4 E-Tron has some tough competition as an electric tow car for its respective price point. The Q4 E-Tron faces even tougher wider market competition from the likes of Polestar, Nissan, Hyundai, Kia and BMW. While the towing range of the Audi Q4 E-Tron is reasonably competitive, its towing capacity and maximum charging speed are below average.

As I discuss in my article on which electric tow cars charge the fastest when it comes to towing as the range is typically cut by half getting energy back into the battery as quickly as possible is vital. The maximum charge rate of the Audi Q4 E-Tron at 126 kW is below average compared to wider market competition. While high powered chargers above 50kW are not that prevalent currently, over the life of the vehicle high powered DC rapid charging stalls will be much more widely available. And unfortunately, compared to the competition, the Audi Q4 E-Tron will rapid charge at a significantly reduced rate.

Chris

Hi, I’m Chris. I own and write all the content on ElectricTowCars.co.uk. The content above is purely my own personal thoughts/opinions/research and should not be treated as professional advice. I hope you find the content above useful to help you find your future ideal electric tow car or truck.

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